in praise of folly.


Thus Spake Bob Dylan: Suddenly I turned around & she was standing there; with silver bracelets on her wrists & flowers in her hair; she walked up to me so gracefully & took my crown of thorns; "Come in," she said, "I'll give you shelter from the storm."
Kinderdijk, Netherlands

Kinderdijk, Netherlands

Tagged: unescoworld heritage sitekinderdijkhollandnetherlands

Good morning from Lekkerland, South Holland!

Good morning from Lekkerland, South Holland!

Tagged: netherlandslekkerlandhollandeuropean travelsgrand tour

npr:

A few years ago, award-winning animal photographer Seth Casteel became an overnight sensation when his photos of dogs underwater went viral. What followed was a book deal that resulted in the New York Times best-seller Underwater Dogs.

Casteel’s new book, out Sept. 16, is possibly the only thing cuter thanUnderwater Dogs: Underwater Puppies.

Casteel on the logistics of photographing puppies underwater

I’m wearing a dog costume so that the dogs can feel like I’m one of the pack. … Just kidding. … I usually just wear a wet suit just in case. You know, if you spend 12 hours in a pool with a bunch of dogs, inevitably you’re going to get scratched up a little bit. So I do wear a wet suit. But I just hold my breath — that’s about it. I’m underwater sometimes just a few seconds, sometimes 30 seconds, 60 seconds. But I have my wet suit on. I bring the toys. I bring the fun. And we just have a blast.

Ridiculously Cute Underwater Puppies (You’re Welcome)

Photo credit: Seth Casteel/Courtesy of Little, Brown and Co.

Tagged: puppiesunderwaternprfuzzy little animals

The Gundalow on the Piscataqua River passing Portsmouth

The Gundalow on the Piscataqua River passing Portsmouth

Tagged: GundalowPortsmouthnew hampshirenew englandpiscataquaportsmouth decks

Nikolaj Coster-Waldau : TIFF 2014

Tagged: Nicolaj Coster-WaldauJaime Lannisterdanishbeautiful mandenmark

Source: nikolajcosterswaldau

greencarnations:

spacethefinalfuck:

mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:

Female BAMFs Throughout History

this is fab BUT WHERE ARE THEIR NAMES?

I’m always wanting to read more about these posts immediately and I have trouble finding the sources.

Tagged: you go girlbamf girls club

Source: mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

Isadora Duncan was killed 87 years ago today (1927) in a car accident in Nice, France.

Isadora Duncan was killed 87 years ago today (1927) in a car accident in Nice, France.

Tagged: isadora duncandancers

Plum Island, 19th c.

Plum Island, 19th c.

Tagged: new englandhistorymassachusettsold photoplum islandnewburyport

Tagged: the lady washingtonoregontall ships

Autumn cometh. And with it, my frivolous need for this jacket.
www.sundance,com

Autumn cometh. And with it, my frivolous need for this jacket.

www.sundance,com

Tagged: sundancefall style

tiny-librarian:

theshelteringschuy:

Today marks the 2,044 anniversary of the death of Cleopatra (30 BCE), an apparent suicide by asp-bite after the defeat of her navy at the Battle of Actium by the Caesar Augustus (proclaiming himself heir to his uncle’s empire) and the death of her consort Mark Antony, who she took up with after her affair with Julius Caesar, which resulted in a child that most certainly threatened Augustus’ claim on the Roman Empire. Not many women in the history of the world have the distinction of inspiring such lust, resulting in warfare and changing the course of powerful empires.

You’re about 18 days too late, she took her own life on the 12th, not the 30th.
And “Caesar Augustus” was called Octavian at the time, he didn’t acquire the name Augustus till later on. He also didn’t proclaim himself heir to his great-uncle’s empire, he was named heir in Caesar’s will.

Great, take it up with the History Channel: http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/cleopatra-commits-suicide
That aside, the point was that she was a bad-ass female figure in history, not that Caesar Augustus was called Octavian at the time- its the same guy, no? Being named in a will certainly gives him a claim to proclaim. But I did inaccurately call him Caesar’s nephew, rather than great-nephew-  so I’m sorry about distributing any false information.

tiny-librarian:

theshelteringschuy:

Today marks the 2,044 anniversary of the death of Cleopatra (30 BCE), an apparent suicide by asp-bite after the defeat of her navy at the Battle of Actium by the Caesar Augustus (proclaiming himself heir to his uncle’s empire) and the death of her consort Mark Antony, who she took up with after her affair with Julius Caesar, which resulted in a child that most certainly threatened Augustus’ claim on the Roman Empire. Not many women in the history of the world have the distinction of inspiring such lust, resulting in warfare and changing the course of powerful empires.

You’re about 18 days too late, she took her own life on the 12th, not the 30th.

And “Caesar Augustus” was called Octavian at the time, he didn’t acquire the name Augustus till later on. He also didn’t proclaim himself heir to his great-uncle’s empire, he was named heir in Caesar’s will.

Great, take it up with the History Channel: http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/cleopatra-commits-suicide

That aside, the point was that she was a bad-ass female figure in history, not that Caesar Augustus was called Octavian at the time- its the same guy, no? Being named in a will certainly gives him a claim to proclaim. But I did inaccurately call him Caesar’s nephew, rather than great-nephew-  so I’m sorry about distributing any false information.

Tagged: nit-pickingcleopatraworld history

Source: theshelteringschuy

obytheby:

applecocaine:

myjamflavouredmindtardis:

megan15:

theybuildbuildings:

vintagegal:

Girls pose by a jail that recalls the witch trials of 1692 in Salem, Massachusetts. Photo taken in 1945.

I recently learned that the water in Salem was contaminated with the fungus from which LSD is derived and a legitimate theory for the whole thing is that everyone in the town was tripping balls 

This might be the greatest thing ive ever seen on the internet

We did a whole massive thing on this in history. I believe the fungus in question is called Ergot and it’s terrifying. It makes your muscles spasm so when they had seizures that was the reason, not because they were possessed. One woman had to be strapped to her bed, she was seizing so bad. And, like ‘theybuildbuildings’ said, it had the same effects as LSD; as soon as you touch it, let alone consume it, it messes with your entire system. The worst thing is, you practically always had a bad trip. Many complained about bugs crawling under their skin or monsters emerging from the shadows to scratch and bite at them until they were screaming. It was a horrendous thing and the worst part is, Ergot is still around. It grows on crops and, if your wheat isn’t properly treated, it can be eaten and you’ll most likely experience the same as the women of Salem. 

god i love history

This is hella cool and almost correct… 
The effects on the people of Salem were probably from consuming bread with the fungus in it, not from contaminated water. And apparently rye is way more commonly affected than wheat. In fact, often the members of the clergy were able to afford nicer bread made from wheat and thus were not as commonly affected.
You don’t go on a spasm-y trip just by touching it. You have to consume it for weeks, which results in chronic poisoning. ( If you stop eating it early enough, you may recover. So when people suffering from these “demonic possessions” took refuge in churches and stopped eating low-grade rye bread they were sometimes miraculously healed. 
More interesting facts:
Ergot poisoning can result in convulsions & hallucinations, or it can cause gangrene, depending on which group of active alkaloids are present. (Horrifying, either way.) It killed a lot of people in Europe in the Middle Ages. 
In Europe, often there was a strong correlation between wet summers (which provide ideal conditions for ergot) and reports of witchcraft/ possession. And in Norway and Scotland, records of witch persecution are only found in areas where rye was grown and used to make bread.
And I just learned right now that one author dude translated the word “Beowulf” as “barley-wolf” which could indicate a connection to ergot. The LSD-like effects could be a valid explanation for stories of Old Norse warriors going into the a sort of trancelike battle rage.
(this is exactly the kind of stuff my herbology medicinal plants class is about, it’s so cool omfg. we had a lecture on ergot last week.)

Wow, this is the first I’ve heard of this.

obytheby:

applecocaine:

myjamflavouredmindtardis:

megan15:

theybuildbuildings:

vintagegal:

Girls pose by a jail that recalls the witch trials of 1692 in Salem, Massachusetts. Photo taken in 1945.

I recently learned that the water in Salem was contaminated with the fungus from which LSD is derived and a legitimate theory for the whole thing is that everyone in the town was tripping balls 

This might be the greatest thing ive ever seen on the internet

We did a whole massive thing on this in history. I believe the fungus in question is called Ergot and it’s terrifying. It makes your muscles spasm so when they had seizures that was the reason, not because they were possessed. One woman had to be strapped to her bed, she was seizing so bad. And, like ‘theybuildbuildings’ said, it had the same effects as LSD; as soon as you touch it, let alone consume it, it messes with your entire system. The worst thing is, you practically always had a bad trip. Many complained about bugs crawling under their skin or monsters emerging from the shadows to scratch and bite at them until they were screaming. It was a horrendous thing and the worst part is, Ergot is still around. It grows on crops and, if your wheat isn’t properly treated, it can be eaten and you’ll most likely experience the same as the women of Salem. 

god i love history

This is hella cool and almost correct… 

The effects on the people of Salem were probably from consuming bread with the fungus in it, not from contaminated water. And apparently rye is way more commonly affected than wheat. In fact, often the members of the clergy were able to afford nicer bread made from wheat and thus were not as commonly affected.

You don’t go on a spasm-y trip just by touching it. You have to consume it for weeks, which results in chronic poisoning. ( If you stop eating it early enough, you may recover. So when people suffering from these “demonic possessions” took refuge in churches and stopped eating low-grade rye bread they were sometimes miraculously healed. 

More interesting facts:

Ergot poisoning can result in convulsions & hallucinations, or it can cause gangrene, depending on which group of active alkaloids are present. (Horrifying, either way.) It killed a lot of people in Europe in the Middle Ages. 

In Europe, often there was a strong correlation between wet summers (which provide ideal conditions for ergot) and reports of witchcraft/ possession. And in Norway and Scotland, records of witch persecution are only found in areas where rye was grown and used to make bread.

And I just learned right now that one author dude translated the word “Beowulf” as “barley-wolf” which could indicate a connection to ergot. The LSD-like effects could be a valid explanation for stories of Old Norse warriors going into the a sort of trancelike battle rage.

(this is exactly the kind of stuff my herbology medicinal plants class is about, it’s so cool omfg. we had a lecture on ergot last week.)

Wow, this is the first I’ve heard of this.

Tagged: salem witch trialssalem massachusettsNew England1698witchcraftmassachusetts history

Source: vintagegal

So I made myself ready presently, and walked to the Tower; and there got up upon one of the high places, …and there I did see the houses at the end of the bridge all on fire, and an infinite great fire on this and the other side … of the bridge… .”

- Samuel Pepys diary entry September 2, 1666

The Great Fire of London began 348 years ago today in 1666. Starting on Pudding Lane at the home of the baker to King Charles II, the fire spread quickly among the half-timbered houses crafted from wood and pitch. 90% of the medieval city within the Roman walls was destroyed, and yet the death count is remarkably low due to the probability of poor Londoners not being accounted for. The Great Fire raged for 4 days. Today there is a monument on the exact location of the baker’s house, where it all began.

London would be rebuilt predominantly in stone, enlisting Sir Christopher Wren and other famed architects to re-create the city to be what it is today- a virtual masterpiece. 

Tagged: londongreat fire of londontoday in historysamuel pepysgreat britainenglandking charles iipudding lane

Excellent question.

Excellent question.

Tagged: knowledge

Source: omg-relatable

Today marks the 2,044 anniversary of the death of Cleopatra (30 BCE), an apparent suicide by asp-bite after the defeat of her navy at the Battle of Actium by the Caesar Augustus (proclaiming himself heir to his uncle’s empire) and the death of her consort Mark Antony, who she took up with after her affair with Julius Caesar, which resulted in a child that most certainly threatened Augustus’ claim on the Roman Empire. Not many women in the history of the world have the distinction of inspiring such lust,  resulting in warfare and changing the course of powerful empires.

Today marks the 2,044 anniversary of the death of Cleopatra (30 BCE), an apparent suicide by asp-bite after the defeat of her navy at the Battle of Actium by the Caesar Augustus (proclaiming himself heir to his uncle’s empire) and the death of her consort Mark Antony, who she took up with after her affair with Julius Caesar, which resulted in a child that most certainly threatened Augustus’ claim on the Roman Empire. Not many women in the history of the world have the distinction of inspiring such lust, resulting in warfare and changing the course of powerful empires.

Tagged: cleopatradeath dayripancient historyworld historyegyptptolemaicdynasties